• Mark Dayton
    0
    He lived alone, and, so to speak, outside of every social relation; and as he knew that in this world account must be taken of friction, and that friction retards, he never rubbed against anybody.
  • Mark Dayton
    0
    As for Passepartout, he was a true Parisian of Paris.
  • Mark Dayton
    0
    Since he had abandoned his own country for England, taking service as a valet, he had in vain searched for a master after his own heart.
  • Mark Dayton
    0
    Passepartout was by no means one of those pert dunces depicted by Moliere with a bold gaze and a nose held high in the air; he was an honest fellow, with a pleasant face, lips a trifle protruding, soft-mannered and serviceable, with a good round head, such as one likes to see on the shoulders of a friend.
  • Mark Dayton
    0
    His eyes were blue, his complexion rubicund, his figure almost portly and well-built, his body muscular, and his physical powers fully developed by the exercises of his younger days.
  • Mark Dayton
    0
    His brown hair was somewhat tumbled; for, while the ancient sculptors are said to have known eighteen methods of arranging Minerva's tresses, Passepartout was familiar with but one of dressing his own: three strokes of a large-tooth comb completed his toilet.
  • Mark Dayton
    0
    It would be rash to predict how Passepartout's lively nature would agree with Mr. Fogg.
  • Mark Dayton
    0
    It was impossible to tell whether the new servant would turn out as absolutely methodical as his master required; experience alone could solve the question.
  • Mark Dayton
    0
    Passepartout had been a sort of vagrant in his early years, and now yearned for repose; but so far he had failed to find it, though he had already served in ten English houses.
  • Mark Dayton
    0
    But he could not take root in any of these; with chagrin, he found his masters invariably whimsical and irregular, constantly running about the country, or on the look-out for adventure.
  • Mark Dayton
    0
    His last master, young Lord Longferry, Member of Parliament, after passing his nights in the Haymarket taverns, was too often brought home in the morning on policemen's shoulders.
  • Adam Hayworth
    12
    "I am sorry," said the conductor; "but we shall be off at once. There's the bell ringing now."
  • Adam Hayworth
    12
    Passepartout had been a sort of vagrant in his early years, and now yearned for repose; but so far he had failed to find it, though he had already served in ten English houses.
  • Adam Hayworth
    12
    His last master, young Lord Longferry, Member of Parliament, after passing his nights in the Haymarket taverns, was too often brought home in the morning on policemen's shoulders.
  • Adam Hayworth
    12
    He lived alone, and, so to speak, outside of every social relation; and as he knew that in this world account must be taken of friction, and that friction retards, he never rubbed against anybody.
  • Adam Hayworth
    12
    Since he had abandoned his own country for England, taking service as a valet, he had in vain searched for a master after his own heart.
  • Zara Price
    0
    Passepartout had been a sort of vagrant in his early years, and now yearned for repose; but so far he had failed to find it, though he had already served in ten English houses.Adam Hayworth

    But he could not take root in any of these; with chagrin, he found his masters invariably whimsical and irregular, constantly running about the country, or on the look-out for adventure.
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