• Adam Hayworth
    12
    By evening, the log showed that two hundred and twenty miles had been accomplished from Hong Kong, and Mr. Fogg might hope that he would be able to reach Yokohama without recording any delay in his journal; in which case, the many misadventures which had overtaken him since he left London would not seriously affect his journey.

    The Tankadere entered the Straits of Fo-Kien, which separate the island of Formosa from the Chinese coast, in the small hours of the night, and crossed the Tropic of Cancer. The sea was very rough in the straits, full of eddies formed by the counter-currents, and the chopping waves broke her course, whilst it became very difficult to stand on deck.

    At daybreak the wind began to blow hard again, and the heavens seemed to predict a gale. The barometer announced a speedy change, the mercury rising and falling capriciously; the sea also, in the south-east, raised long surges which indicated a tempest. The sun had set the evening before in a red mist, in the midst of the phosphorescent scintillations of the ocean.

    John Bunsby long examined the threatening aspect of the heavens, muttering indistinctly between his teeth. At last he said in a low voice to Mr. Fogg, "Shall I speak out to your honour?"

    "Of course."
  • Philippa Rizvi
    7
    "No." "I will come back to America to find him," said Phileas Fogg calmly. "It would not be right for an Englishman to permit himself to be treated in that way, without retaliating." The detective smiled, but did not reply.
  • Adam Hayworth
    12
    The next morning poor, jaded, famished Passepartout said to himself that he must get something to eat at all hazards, and the sooner he did so the better. He might, indeed, sell his watch; but he would have starved first. Now or never he must use the strong, if not melodious voice which nature had bestowed upon him.
  • Joe Jeffries
    4
    He knew several French and English songs, and resolved to try them upon the Japanese, who must be lovers of music, since they were for ever pounding on their cymbals, tam-tams, and tambourines, and could not but appreciate European talent.
  • Jackie Taylor
    4
    The next morning poor, jaded, famished Passepartout said to himself that he must get something to eat at all hazards, and the sooner he did so the better.Adam Hayworth

    "It would be perfectly so," replied Phileas Fogg.
  • Jessica Bell
    4
    "Well, we are really in America," thought Passepartout, "and the conductor is a gentleman of the first order!"
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    "It would not be right for an Englishman to permit himself to be treated in that way, without retaliating."
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    The detective smiled, but did not reply.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    It was clear that Mr. Fogg was one of those Englishmen who, while they do not tolerate duelling at home, fight abroad when their honour is attacked.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    At a quarter before six the travellers reached the station, and found the train ready to depart.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    As he was about to enter it, Mr. Fogg called a porter, and said to him: "My friend, was there not some trouble to-day in San Francisco?"
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    "It was a political meeting, sir," replied the porter.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    "But I thought there was a great deal of disturbance in the streets."
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    "It was only a meeting assembled for an election."
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    "The election of a general-in-chief, no doubt?" asked Mr. Fogg.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    "No, sir; of a justice of the peace." Phileas Fogg got into the train, which started off at full speed.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    The Pacific Railroad is, however, really divided into two distinct lines: the Central Pacific, between San Francisco and Ogden, and the Union Pacific, between Ogden and Omaha.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    Five main lines connect Omaha with New York. New York and San Francisco are thus united by an uninterrupted metal ribbon, which measures no less than three thousand seven hundred and eighty-six miles.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    The journey from New York to San Francisco consumed, formerly, under the most favourable conditions, at least six months.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    It is now accomplished in seven days.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    It was in 1862 that, in spite of the Southern Members of Congress, who wished a more southerly route, it was decided to lay the road between the forty-first and forty-second parallels.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    President Lincoln himself fixed the end of the line at Omaha, in Nebraska.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    The work was at once commenced, and pursued with true American energy; nor did the rapidity with which it went on injuriously affect its good execution.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    The road grew, on the prairies, a mile and a half a day.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    A locomotive, running on the rails laid down the evening before, brought the rails to be laid on the morrow, and advanced upon them as fast as they were put in position.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    The Pacific Railroad is joined by several branches in Iowa, Kansas, Colorado, and Oregon.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    On leaving Omaha, it passes along the left bank of the Platte River as far as the junction of its northern branch, follows its southern branch, crosses the Laramie territory and the Wahsatch Mountains, turns the Great Salt Lake, and reaches Salt Lake City, the Mormon capital, plunges into the Tuilla Valley, across the American Desert, Cedar and Humboldt Mountains, the Sierra Nevada, and descends, via Sacramento, to the Pacific.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    The car which he occupied was a sort of long omnibus on eight wheels, and with no compartments in the interior.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    It was supplied with two rows of seats, perpendicular to the direction of the train on either side of an aisle which conducted to the front and rear platforms.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    These platforms were found throughout the train, and the passengers were able to pass from one end of the train to the other.
  • Josephine Miller
    0
    It was supplied with saloon cars, balcony cars, restaurants, and smoking-cars; theatre cars alone were wanting, and they will have these some day.
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